International Women’s Day Doodle 2014

Women have historically been underrepresented in almost all fields: science, school curricula, business, politics—and, sadly, doodles. In addition to our continued effort for doodle diversity and inclusion (see progress on http://google.com/doodles), today’s truly International Women’s Day doodle features a host of inspiring women from around the world, including the President of Lithuania, a brave Pakistani education activist, an ever-curious explorer, and dozens more. Find the full list of participants: http://goo.gl/fzUBZn

nuvonewsweekly:

“Rebecca Townsend reports on the dance action being held in Indianapolis by the On Billion Rising movement to support the fight against violence against women.”

nuvonewsweekly:

“Rebecca Townsend reports on the dance action being held in Indianapolis by the On Billion Rising movement to support the fight against violence against women.”

singlemothergrants:

When women make less than men for the same work, it hurts the entire family—especially since mothers are the primary or co-breadwinners in most households, yet still earn just 77 cents for every dollar a man earns.

singlemothergrants:

When women make less than men for the same work, it hurts the entire family—especially since mothers are the primary or co-breadwinners in most households, yet still earn just 77 cents for every dollar a man earns.

Tags: Economy


‘One time I went to the market and my face was covered, but I forgot and tried to eat a banana through the burka. It wasn’t terrible just because of the burka; we had a lot of terrible times. We weren’t allowed to go out, so at home I wrote some poems and articles to keep my mind busy, but I don’t know where to start about women’s problems in my country’Saliha, 28, journalist, Ministry of Women’s Affairs, Kabul, Afghanistan
Photo from the ‘Hunger’ series by James Mollison

‘One time I went to the market and my face was covered, but I forgot and tried to eat a banana through the burka. It wasn’t terrible just because of the burka; we had a lot of terrible times. We weren’t allowed to go out, so at home I wrote some poems and articles to keep my mind busy, but I don’t know where to start about women’s problems in my country’

Saliha, 28, journalist, Ministry of Women’s Affairs, Kabul, Afghanistan

Photo from the ‘Hunger’ series by James Mollison

(Source: dispirits)

Tags: Human Rights

unicef:

VINTAGE UNICEF - AUDREY HEPBURN1988 - Ethiopia
UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Audrey Hepburn smiles as she carries a child on her back, in the northern town of Mehal Meda in Shoa Province. Ms. Hepburn was visiting a food distribution centre in the town.
In 1988, internationally known film actor and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Audrey Hepburn travelled to Ethiopia on her first official UNICEF mission, to raise awareness of the impact of the continuing drought on the country’s children and women. During her trip, Ms. Hepburn visited UNICEF-assisted health clinics and supplementary feeding programmes, ‘food-for-work’ projects, an income-generating project and an orphanage for children who have been abandoned or orphaned in this region during the drought.
© UNICEF/NYHQ1988-0091/John Isaac
http://www.unicef.org/

unicef:

VINTAGE UNICEF - AUDREY HEPBURN
1988 - Ethiopia

UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Audrey Hepburn smiles as she carries a child on her back, in the northern town of Mehal Meda in Shoa Province. Ms. Hepburn was visiting a food distribution centre in the town.

In 1988, internationally known film actor and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Audrey Hepburn travelled to Ethiopia on her first official UNICEF mission, to raise awareness of the impact of the continuing drought on the country’s children and women. During her trip, Ms. Hepburn visited UNICEF-assisted health clinics and supplementary feeding programmes, ‘food-for-work’ projects, an income-generating project and an orphanage for children who have been abandoned or orphaned in this region during the drought.

© UNICEF/NYHQ1988-0091/John Isaac

http://www.unicef.org/

mercycorps:

Two women make felt handcrafts at a co-op in Mongolia. Mercy Corps supports families and communities in rural Mongolia with programs focusing on economic opportunity, civil society and natural resource management.
Photo by Ben David for Mercy Corps

mercycorps:

Two women make felt handcrafts at a co-op in Mongolia. Mercy Corps supports families and communities in rural Mongolia with programs focusing on economic opportunity, civil society and natural resource management.

Photo by Ben David for Mercy Corps

Tags: Mercy Corps

theadventureproject:

“What do you like to cook on your new stove?”
“Me? Everything.”

theadventureproject:

“What do you like to cook on your new stove?”

“Me? Everything.”

unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: 13 February 2013
Continuing conflict in northern Mali has displaced nearly 229,000 people and forced over 152,000 to seek refuge in neighbouring countries. This has deepened challenges for children already threatened by ongoing nutrition insecurity in Africa’s Sahel region.
Photographed here is Wana Haidera.  She is 6 years old and because of the fighting…she has become “displaced” and now has to live with her extended family in Ségou Region of Mali. 
©UNICEF/Tanya Bindra
To see more: www.unicef.org/photography

unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK: 13 February 2013

Continuing conflict in northern Mali has displaced nearly 229,000 people and forced over 152,000 to seek refuge in neighbouring countries. This has deepened challenges for children already threatened by ongoing nutrition insecurity in Africa’s Sahel region.

Photographed here is Wana Haidera.  She is 6 years old and because of the fighting…she has become “displaced” and now has to live with her extended family in Ségou Region of Mali. 

©UNICEF/Tanya Bindra

To see more: www.unicef.org/photography

Tags: Poverty Unicef

tedx:

A TEDx Intern lunch break playlist: Happy Galentine’s Day! 5 talks to help you celebrate the ladies in your life
Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, the day we all love to love (or) hate, where we get to smother our loved ones with praise, adoration, and heart-shaped chocolates. But today, today is Galentine’s Day, the day created by the fictitious councilwoman Leslie Knope from the television show Parks and Recreation for women to honor the women in their life — and while, officially, this has nothing to do with TEDx — it is a favorite holiday of our editorial intern, who put together this playlist in its honor.

“What’s Galentine’s Day? Oh, it’s only the best day of the year. Every February 13th, my lady friends and I leave our husbands and our boyfriends at home, and we just come and kick it, breakfast-style. Ladies celebrate ladies.”—Leslie Knope

Here at TEDx we’re no strangers to the myriad of inventions, discoveries, and innovations women are contributing to the modern world, the challenges they face, and the ways they are facing them. Through the TEDxWomen program and thousands of standard TEDx events around the world, we know there are still Marie Curies, still Valentina Tereshkovs, and still Georgia O’Keeffes — the talks are proof.
So, in honor of Galentine’s Day, and hard-working, butt-kicking ladies everywhere, 5 TEDx Talks that Leslie Knope would be proud of:

Shabana Basij-Rasikh: Dare to educate Afghan girlsIn this talk at TEDxWomen 2012, Shabana Basij-Rasikh discusses how she and her sister risked their lives by going to a secret school after the Taliban outlawed school for girls in Afghanistan. Hers is a talk that will make you feel privileged to even have a chance to watch classmates throw spitballs in geometry class. A must-watch for anyone — male or female — who’s ever not wanted to get up and go to school.

Soap saves: Renée Botta at TEDxDUChangeRenée Botta works in improving sanitation measures in slums in Nairobi. When she learned of a woman in a neighboring slum making homemade soap, she thought the process would be a good way for community members to get involved in improving local sanitation — until she met Helen — a single mother who decided to not only make this special soap herself, but also to sell it, as a way to become financially independent and take her health, her family’s, and her community’s into her own hands.

A teen still just figuring it out: Tavi Gevinson at TEDxTeenIn this talk, 15-year-old Tavi Gevinson, the editor of Rookie magazine, discusses modern media’s portrayal of women, and her struggle to find portrayals of women that actually resemble real women she knows. When she looked at media representations of teen girls, she ran into the same dead ends, she says, so she decided to take matters into her own hands, and create a space where the content was not just aimed at teenage girls, but made by teenage girls as well.

I’m an astronaut … and a woman: Nicole Stott at TEDxSugarLandIn this inspiring talk from TEDxSugarLand, astronaut Nicole Stott tells her story of becoming an aeronautical engineer and going into space, drawing inspiration from the women who came before her. “I was usually the only girl in my [classes],” she says in her talk, “but I never really noticed it. I never noticed it unless somebody else pointed it out to me. And I think that’s because I was studying something I loved to do, and all the people around me were studying something they love to do as well.”

Why you fear math: Laura Overdeck at TEDxWestVillageWomenIn this talk, mathematician Laura Overstock explains how adults reinforce the stereotype that boys are naturally better at math and science than girls. “If you give men and women a quiz with math,” she says, “and for some of them, at the beginning they’re asked to check off their gender … the women who have on their test [the question] asking them to check off their gender, do worse than the women who didn’t have that question. Just being reminded that you’re female makes you do worse on a math test.” She has ideas to change this — just watch.
Bonus: TEDWomen talks from Ms. Knope’s heroes, Madeleine Albright and Hillary Clinton:
Madeleine Albright: On being a woman and a diplomat
Hillary Clinton’s surprise TEDWomen talk on empowering women and girls
Photo via Salon.

tedx:

A TEDx Intern lunch break playlist: Happy Galentine’s Day! 5 talks to help you celebrate the ladies in your life

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, the day we all love to love (or) hate, where we get to smother our loved ones with praise, adoration, and heart-shaped chocolates. But today, today is Galentine’s Day, the day created by the fictitious councilwoman Leslie Knope from the television show Parks and Recreation for women to honor the women in their life — and while, officially, this has nothing to do with TEDx — it is a favorite holiday of our editorial intern, who put together this playlist in its honor.

“What’s Galentine’s Day? Oh, it’s only the best day of the year. Every February 13th, my lady friends and I leave our husbands and our boyfriends at home, and we just come and kick it, breakfast-style. Ladies celebrate ladies.”
—Leslie Knope

Here at TEDx we’re no strangers to the myriad of inventions, discoveries, and innovations women are contributing to the modern world, the challenges they face, and the ways they are facing them. Through the TEDxWomen program and thousands of standard TEDx events around the world, we know there are still Marie Curies, still Valentina Tereshkovs, and still Georgia O’Keeffes — the talks are proof.

So, in honor of Galentine’s Day, and hard-working, butt-kicking ladies everywhere, 5 TEDx Talks that Leslie Knope would be proud of:


Shabana Basij-Rasikh: Dare to educate Afghan girls
In this talk at TEDxWomen 2012, Shabana Basij-Rasikh discusses how she and her sister risked their lives by going to a secret school after the Taliban outlawed school for girls in Afghanistan. Hers is a talk that will make you feel privileged to even have a chance to watch classmates throw spitballs in geometry class. A must-watch for anyone — male or female — who’s ever not wanted to get up and go to school.

Soap saves: Renée Botta at TEDxDUChange
Renée Botta works in improving sanitation measures in slums in Nairobi. When she learned of a woman in a neighboring slum making homemade soap, she thought the process would be a good way for community members to get involved in improving local sanitation — until she met Helen — a single mother who decided to not only make this special soap herself, but also to sell it, as a way to become financially independent and take her health, her family’s, and her community’s into her own hands.

A teen still just figuring it out: Tavi Gevinson at TEDxTeen
In this talk, 15-year-old Tavi Gevinson, the editor of Rookie magazine, discusses modern media’s portrayal of women, and her struggle to find portrayals of women that actually resemble real women she knows. When she looked at media representations of teen girls, she ran into the same dead ends, she says, so she decided to take matters into her own hands, and create a space where the content was not just aimed at teenage girls, but made by teenage girls as well.


I’m an astronaut … and a woman: Nicole Stott at TEDxSugarLand
In this inspiring talk from TEDxSugarLand, astronaut Nicole Stott tells her story of becoming an aeronautical engineer and going into space, drawing inspiration from the women who came before her. “I was usually the only girl in my [classes],” she says in her talk, “but I never really noticed it. I never noticed it unless somebody else pointed it out to me. And I think that’s because I was studying something I loved to do, and all the people around me were studying something they love to do as well.”

Why you fear math: Laura Overdeck at TEDxWestVillageWomen
In this talk, mathematician Laura Overstock explains how adults reinforce the stereotype that boys are naturally better at math and science than girls. “If you give men and women a quiz with math,” she says, “and for some of them, at the beginning they’re asked to check off their gender … the women who have on their test [the question] asking them to check off their gender, do worse than the women who didn’t have that question. Just being reminded that you’re female makes you do worse on a math test.” She has ideas to change this — just watch.

Bonus: TEDWomen talks from Ms. Knope’s heroes, Madeleine Albright and Hillary Clinton:

Photo via Salon.